Lesson Launch Archives

Georgia, Golf, and a Great Conference!

March 22, 2018

Lesson Launch: a weekly academic social studies teaching tips blog, which occasionally touches on other topics.

By Dr. Paul E. Binford
President, Mississippi Council of the Social Studies

 

For the past three years, I have attended the Kennesaw State University (KSU) Conference on Young Adult Literature (YAL), which has fallen on the Monday after my university’s (Mississippi State University) spring break.  I also get to meet up with my good friend, Dr. Steve Bickmore (Associate Professor at UNLV), whose scholarly expertise includes young adult literature (check out his blog:  Bickmore's YA Wednesday).

Read more: Georgia, Golf, and a Great Conference!

Your Next Presentation: Pictures, Then Words

February 22, 2018

 

Lesson Launch: a weekly academic social studies teaching tips blog, which occasionally touches on other topics.

 

By Dr. Paul E. Binford
President, Mississippi Council of the Social Studies 

 

Image Courtesy of the Library of Congress

 

In They Snooze, You Lose:  The Educator’s Guide to Successful Presentations (2011), Lynell Burmark offers an array of practical suggestions to enhance your next presentation.  In the book’s formatting, Burmark clearly practices what she preaches!

 

This presentation guide is user friendly.  Each couple of pages of text are followed by a practical activity to involve the reader.  For example, open up one of your existing slide presentations and count the number of words on a typical slide or—better yet—count the words on each slide and divide them by the number of slides in the presentation (excluding the title slide). 

 

What is the average number of words you use on a given slide?

 

Read more: Your Next Presentation: Pictures, Then Words

Banning the "L" Word

February 8, 2018

Lesson Launch: a weekly academic social studies teaching tips blog, which occasionally touches on other topics.

By Dr. Paul E. Binford
President, Mississippi Council of the Social Studies 

Lecturea discourse [or a formal, organized talk] given before an audience or class especially for instruction.[1]

Notice:  The “L” word—lecture—is being banned from this blog!

The term is anachronisitc harkening back to the sixteenth century.  However, its roots go back even further to two related Latin terms lectura “a reading” and lectus “to gather, collect, pick out, choose.”  In its latter sense, lecture is closely related to another English word of particular relevance to democracies and social studies education—elect—which also involves a picking out or choosing.[2]

Read more: Banning the "L" Word

Hurry to the Shucking Shed: Child Labor in Mississippi and the Visual Discovery Strategy

February 1, 2018

Lesson Launch: a weekly academic social studies teaching tips blog, which occasionally touches on other topics.

By Dr. Paul E. Binford
President, Mississippi Council of the Social Studies 

Often before 3 am, the whistles blew along the gulf coast, from the Florida Panhandle to Louisiana, summoning “piece-work” laborers—many of them children—to the damp and darkened drudgery of the shucking sheds.  The night’s harvest would arrive in the wee hours of the morning and then was offloaded from the fishing boats onto mini-train cars where the oysters were steamed before being shucked (opening the oyster shell and removing the oyster meat or bivalve) for canning. 

To minimize spoilage, the oysters had to be processed promptly, which often meant shuckers had to work long days in excess of twelve hours—until the night’s harvest was completed.  In the early years of the twentieth century, the largest canneries were in Biloxi, Mississippi—the “Seafood Capital of the World.”

Read more: Hurry to the Shucking Shed: Child Labor in Mississippi and the Visual Discovery Strategy